Linda’s Books

Fiction

The newest vice president at Clearview Chemicals has been given the sole mission of downsizing the corporate departments, a task he relishes but one he will never get the chance to complete. R. B. Swaine, soon nicknamed Really Big Swine, demoralizes his employees within days of his arrival, and his meetings are bloodbaths of firings, with threats of far more. When his brutal murder is discovered, the news brings out jubilant responses from every employee. Until Swaine’s death, everyone involved feared for their jobs and their income, but now, with a death in their midst and police investigating their friends and coworkers, they are terrified for their very lives. The murderer could be any one of the employees who feared the new vice president’s fury. It could be the Krimpet-loving communications manager Lydia Barrett, who definitely has a secret to hide. Or it could be Cal Ferguson, the local director of health, who admits to being on site the night of the murder. Within twenty-four hours, another murder takes place. Are these two crimes connected? Are there two murderers? Could someone, some trusted colleague, kill and kill again?

“I Know You by Heart” takes an extended family through the death of its matriarch and then through the formalities of the mourning period. Readers, no doubt, know from experience, that no mourning period for anyone, or any family is like any other. All members of the Fielding family have unfinished business, hidden scandals, fearful secrets that create unwitting behavior. Each character provides harsh, but horribly true information, revealed for the first time. In “I Know You by Heart,” all of these elements float about uncontrolled, and the family runs amok. The characters in “I Know You by Heart,” expect their reasonably responsible family members to behave in traditional ways, but the truth is, the Fielding family faces this crisis in the most irrational ways possible. From moments before the funeral, until after the formal grieving process is over, they begrudge, punish and some even learn to love again, over time.

Books Written with Doctors

Readable, practical, a much-needed resource—from a pediatric sports medicine specialist—the only book that focuses on all aspects of sports, exercise, nutrition, and physical activity for kids of all ages and abilities, from infancy through adolescence.

One of the few pediatricians specializing in sports medicine, Dr. Small reminds us that children are not miniature adults; they are physiologically and psychologically different. Parents and coaches need to know what sports are suitable for which age, how to prevent and treat injuries, how to plan sports programs for children with chronic conditions such as asthma or diabetes, and the importance of good nutrition and exercise.

Written, organized, and designed for easy reading and reference with Q&As, charts, instructional drawings, and a detailed index, Dr. Small’s book addresses kids’ needs from infancy through teenage, plus devotes one section to Sports for Every Kid: covering The Young Female Athlete, The Elite Athlete, The Unnatural Athlete, The Overweight Child, The Hyperactive Child, and the Child with a Chronic Disease.

Before the Scalpel: What Everyone Should Know about Anesthesia demystifies the issues surrounding the types and uses of anesthesia and addresses common fears about wakefulness and pain. Straightforward language, real-life examples, photographs and illustrations guide you. Individual chapters focus on how anesthesia is used in plastic and cosmetic surgery, labor, and for dental care. Other chapters explore the special needs of babies and children, how surgeons and anesthesiologists have adapted their techniques in response to growing obesity rates, and discuss how to avoid post-operative nausea and vomiting. Throughout the book, Dr. Dhar carefully flags issues directly affecting your medical care. Each chapter ends with an invaluable checklist, called prescriptives, that highlights key points and provides space to take notes when you talk with your surgeon or anesthesia provider. The checklists help you ask questions relevant to your case and ensure that you receive and remember the answers.